FAQ

  1. Where can I find [my favorite short] on video?
  2. Why doesn't Disney show [my favorite short] anymore?
  3. What is the "spherical" cinematographic process you refer to in the technical specifications?

1 : Where can I find [my favorite short] on video?

It used to be that there were not a lot of the shorts available on video. However, lately Disney has been taking more advantage of the DVD market and put out quite a few sets that are really good; specifically the "Disney Treasures" series. Other DVD listings can be found starting here. Disney did put out a long list of videos in the past and quite a few are still available in some of your older, more established video stores. As complete a list as we can put together begins on our "Domestic Videos" section of the site. Also, although they are technically no longer in print, some of the later "Cartoon Classics" series (among others) can still be found if you look around. This site does not sell videos, nor for the most part can we give you anywhere specifically to go to to find out of print videos although we do provide Amazon.com links for as many as we can. We only keep the listings as a matter of reference.

2 : Why doesn't Disney show [my favorite short] anymore?

Disney has never officially gone on record as to why certain shorts are no longer shown on television. But given the evidence of what has been cut and what shorts are no longer shown, it seems to be no secret that Disney, being a multi-national company, does not want to offend anyone or bring up past differences. The most major short that people ask about is "Der Fuehrer's Face," an extremely popular World War 2 short which won that years Academy Award, yet is never shown anymore. The reason it is never shown seems to be because of it's extreme use of ethnic stereotype and Nazi symbolism. Other shorts, such as "Cannibal Capers" or "Trader Mickey" fall into the same category in regards to their use of what Disney would consider offensive ethnicity. These shorts have been popping up on special edition DVD's, however, usually with an introduction by Leonard Maltin explaining the context in which the short was made.

3 : What is the "spherical" cinematographic process you refer to in the technical specifications?

When a film is projected it is magnified from a (usually) 35mm film to fill the big screen. The spherical process refers to a film that has been magnified by the same ratios both horizontally and vertically. You can contrast this with the anamorphic process which only expands the original 35mm film horizontally, resulting in a wide-screen picture.

... more Q's and A's to be added as we roll along ...